Category Archives: Expert Witness Medical Specialties

Posts related to medical specialties represented by Experts Clearinghouse expert witnesses and consultants.

Autism Spectrum Disorders Expert Witness

With more children being diagnosed with autism today than in past eras, much debate has arisen in the medical community and within families even.  What constitutes the diagnosis of autism?  What level of disability will arise once a diagnosis has been made?  Experts Cleringhouse LLC expert witnesses are world leaders who grapple with these questions and more every day.

If you are in need of an Expert Witness in Autism Spectrum, contact Experts Clearinghouse LLC today by calling us at 713-501-8526 or e-mailing at medexperts@gmail.com.  You can also use the form below.

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Taken from Wikipedia.org:

Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impaired social interactionverbal and non-verbal communication, and restricted and repetitive behavior. Parents usually notice signs in the first two years of their child’s life.  These signs often develop gradually, though some children with autism reach their developmental milestones at a normal pace and then regress.  The diagnostic criteria require that symptoms become apparent in early childhood, typically before age three.

While autism is highly heritable, researchers suspect both environmental and genetic factors as causes.  In rare cases, autism is strongly associated withagents that cause birth defects.  Controversies surround other proposed environmental causes;  for example, the vaccine hypotheses have been disproven. Autism affects information processing in the brain by altering hownerve cells and their synapses connect and organize; how this occurs is not well understood.  It is one of three recognized disorders in the autism spectrum (ASDs), the other two being Asperger syndrome, which lacks delays in cognitive development and language, and pervasive developmental disorder, not otherwise specified (commonly abbreviated as PDD-NOS), which is diagnosed when the full set of criteria for autism or Asperger syndrome are not met

Globally, autism is estimated to affect 21.7 million people as of 2013  As of 2010, the number of people affected is estimated at about 1–2 per 1,000 worldwide. It occurs four to five times more often in boys than girls. About 1.5% of children in the United States (one in 68) are diagnosed with ASD as of 2014, a 30% increase from one in 88 in 2012. The rate of autism among adults aged 18 years and over in the United Kingdom is 1.1%.  The number of people diagnosed has been increasing dramatically since the 1980s, partly due to changes in diagnostic practice and government-subsidized financial incentives for named diagnoses;  the question of whether actual rates have increased is unresolved

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Urology

Experts Clearinghouse LLC consistently delivers the most sought after urologists to law firms, corporations, and governments who need them the most. Our network includes the absolute best credentialed and respected practitioners who testify in the toughest of scenarios, often when other networks have failed.

Call us today for your free initial consultation at 713-501-8526 or e-mail at medexperts@gmail.com.

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Experts Clearinghouse experts in this Specialty have a certificate issued by:  American Board of Urology

Subspecialties include:  Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery, Pediatric Urology

Expert Witness Location Difficulty Level:  MEDIUM

States represented by the network:  Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming

Typical minimum fee for Record Review and Report Writing for this Specialty:  $250 per hour

Typical minimum fee for Testimony for this Specialty:  $300 per hour

For a more complete explanation of Fees, click here

Medical Malpractice issues:  Standard of care

Mass Tort involvements:  Urogynecologists for transvaginal mesh litigation related to pelvic organ prolapse or stress urinary incontinence

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Taken from Wikipedia.org:

Urology (from Greek ????? ouron “urine” and -????? -logia “study of”), also known as genitourinary surgery, is the branch of medicine that focuses on the surgical and medical diseases of the male and female urinary tract system and the male reproductive organs. The organs under the domain of urology include the kidneys, adrenal glands, ureters, urinary bladder, urethra, and the male reproductive organs (testes, epididymis, vas deferens, seminal vesicles,prostate and penis).

The urinary and reproductive tracts are closely linked, and disorders of one often affect the other. Thus a major spectrum of the conditions managed in urology exists under the domain of genitourinary disorders. Urology combines the management of medical (i.e., non-surgical) conditions such as urinary tract infections and benign prostatic hyperplasia, with the management of surgical conditions such as bladder or prostate cancer, kidney stones, congenital abnormalities, traumatic injury, and stress incontinence.

Urology has traditionally been on the cutting-edge of surgical technology in the field of medicine; including minimally invasive robotic and laparoscopic surgery, laser assisted surgeries, and a host of other unique scope-guided-procedures. Urologists are well-trained in open and minimally-invasive techniques, employing real-time ultrasound guidance, fiber-optic endoscopic equipment, and various lasers in the treatment of multiple benign and malignant conditions.[1] In addition, urologists are pioneers in the use of robotics in laparoscopic surgery. Urology is closely related to (and urologists often collaborate with the practitioners of) the medical fields of oncology, nephrology, gynaecology, andrology, pediatric surgery,colorectal surgery, gastroenterology, and endocrinology.

Urology is one of the most competitive and a highly sought-after surgical specialty to enter for physicians, with new urologists comprising less than 1.5% of U.S. medical school graduates each year.[2][3] In Canada, Urology is an exceedingly difficult specialty to match, with less than 0.1% of the position dedicated to Urology.

Urologic surgeons, or urologists, undergo a very rigorous post-graduate surgical training period for a minimum duration of five years, of which 12 months must be completed in general surgery and 36 months must be completed in clinical urology. The remaining 12 months are spent in general surgery, urology or other clinical disciplines relevant to urology.[4] Upon successful completion of a residency program, many urologists choose to undergo further advanced training in a sub-specialty area of expertise through a fellowship lasting an additional 12 to 36 months. These may include: urologic surgery,urologic oncology and urologic oncological surgery, endourology and endourologic surgery, urogynecology andurogynecologic surgery, reconstructive urologic surgery (a form of reconstructive surgery), minimally-invasive urologic surgery, pediatric urology and pediatric urologic surgery (including adolescent urology, the treatment of premature or delayed puberty, and the treatment of congenital urological syndromes, malformations, and deformations), transplanturology (the field of transplant medicine and surgery concerned with transplantation of organs such as the kidneys, bladder tissue, ureters, and, recently penises), voiding dysfunction, neurourology, and androurology and sexual medicine. Additionally, some urologists supplement their fellowships with an additional Masters (2-3 years) or a PhD (4-6 years) in related topics to prepare them for an academic as well as a focused clinical job.

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Thoracic and Cardiac Surgery

Experts Clearinghouse LLC consistently delivers the most sought after thoracic and cardiac surgeons to law firms, corporations, and governments who need them the most.  Our network includes the absolute best credentialed and respected practitioners who testify in the toughest of scenarios, often when other networks have failed.

Call us today for your free initial consultation at 713-501-8526 or e-mail at medexperts@gmail.com.

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Experts Clearinghouse experts in this Specialty have a certificate issued by:  American Board of Thoracic Surgery

Subspecialties include:  Congenital Cardiac Surgery

Expert Witness Location Difficulty Level:  HIGH

States represented by the network:  Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming

Typical minimum fee for Record Review and Report Writing for this Specialty:  $250 per hour

Typical minimum fee for Testimony for this Specialty:  $300 per hour

For a more complete explanation of Fees, click here

Medical Malpractice issues:  Standard of care

Mass Tort involvements:

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Taken from Wikipedia.org:

Cardiothoracic surgery is the field of medicine involved in surgical treatment of diseases affecting organs inside the thorax (the chest)—generally treatment of conditions of the heart (heart disease) and lungs (lung disease). Cardiac surgery (involving the heart and great vessels) and thoracic surgery (involving the lungs) are separate surgical specialties, except in the USA, Australia, New Zealand and in some EU countries, such as the UK and Portugal.[1]

Training

A cardiac surgery residency typically comprises anywhere from 9 to 14 years (or longer) of training to become a fully qualified surgeon. Cardiac surgery training may be combined with thoracic surgery and / or vascular surgery and called cardiovascular (CV) / cardiothoracic (CT) / cardiovascular thoracic (CVT) surgery. Cardiac surgeons may enter a cardiac surgery residency directly from medical school, or first complete a general surgery residency followed by a fellowship. Cardiac surgeons may further sub-specialize cardiac surgery by doing a fellowship in a variety of topics including: pediatric cardiac surgery, cardiac transplantation, adult acquired heart disease, weak heart issues and many more problems in the heart.

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General Surgery, Vascular Surgery

Experts Clearinghouse LLC consistently delivers the most sought after general and vascular surgeons to law firms, corporations, and governments who need them the most.  Our network includes the absolute best credentialed and respected practitioners who testify in the toughest of scenarios, often when other networks have failed.

Call us today for your free initial consultation at 713-501-8526 or e-mail at medexperts@gmail.com.

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Experts Clearinghouse experts in this Specialty have a certificate issued by:  American Board of Surgery

Subspecialties include:  Complex General Surgical Oncology, Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Pediatric Surgery, Surgery of the Hand, Surgical Critical Care

Expert Witness Location Difficulty Level:  MEDIUM

States represented by the network:  Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming

Typical minimum fee for Record Review and Report Writing for this Specialty:  $250 per hour

Typical minimum fee for Testimony for this Specialty:  $300 per hour

For a more complete explanation of Fees, click here

Medical Malpractice issues:  Standard of care

Mass Tort involvements:  General surgeons for Prempro related to breast cancer

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Taken from Wikipedia.org:

General surgery is a surgical specialty that focuses on abdominal contents including esophagus, stomach, small bowel, colon, liver, pancreas, gallbladderand bile ducts, and often the thyroid gland (depending on local reference patterns). They also deal with diseases involving the skin, breast, soft tissue,trauma , peripheral vascular surgery and hernias.

Scope

General surgeons may sub-specialize into one or more of the following disciplines:

Trauma surgery/ Surgical Critical Care

In the United States and Canada, the overall responsibility for trauma care falls under the auspices of general surgery. Some general surgeons obtain advanced training in this field (most commonly surgical critical care) and specialty certification surgical critical care. General surgeons must be able to deal initially with almost any surgical emergency. Often, they are the first port of call to critically ill or gravely injured patients, and must perform a variety of procedures to stabilize such patients, such as thoracostomy, cricothyroidotomy, compartment fasciotomies and emergency laparotomy orthoracotomy to stanch bleeding. They are also called upon to staff surgical intensive care units or trauma intensive care units.[citation needed]

All general surgeons are trained in emergency surgery. Bleeding, infections, bowel obstructions and organ perforations are the main problems they deal with. Cholecystectomy, the surgical removal of the gallbladder, is one of the most common surgical procedures done worldwide. This is most often done electively, but the gallbladder can become acutely inflamed and require an emergency operation. Ruptures of the appendix and small bowel obstructions are other common emergencies.

Laparoscopic surgery

This is a relatively new specialty dealing with minimal access techniques using cameras and small instruments inserted through 0.3 to 1 cm incisions. Robotic surgery is now evolving from this concept (see below). Gallbladders, appendices, and colons can all be removed with this technique. Hernias are now repaired mostly laparoscopically. Most bariatric surgery is performed laparoscopically.[citation needed] General surgeons that are trained today are expected to be proficient in laparoscopic procedures.

Colorectal surgery

General surgeons treat a wide variety of major and minor colon and rectal diseases including inflammatory bowel diseases (such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease), diverticulitis, colon and rectal cancer, gastrointestinal bleeding and hemorrhoids.

Breast surgery

General surgeons perform a majority of all non-cosmetic breast surgery from lumpectomy to mastectomy, especially pertaining to the evaluation and diagnosis, of breast cancer.

Vascular surgery

General surgeons can perform vascular surgery if they receive special training and certification in vascular surgery. Otherwise, these procedures are performed by vascular surgery specialists. However, general surgeons are capable of treating minor vascular disorders.

Endocrine surgery

General surgeons are trained to remove all or part of the thyroid and parathyroid glands in the neck and the adrenal glandsjust above each kidney in the abdomen. In many communities, they are the only surgeon trained to do this. In communities that have a number of subspecialists, other subspecialty surgeons may assume responsibility for these procedures.

Transplant surgery

Responsible for all aspects of pre-operative, operative, and post-operative care of abdominal organ transplant patients. Transplanted organs include liver, kidney, pancreas, and more rarely small bowel.

Surgical oncology

Surgical oncologist refers to a general surgical oncologist (a subspecialty of general surgery), but thoracic surgical oncologists, gynecologic oncologists and so forth can all be considered surgeons who specialize in treating cancer patients. The importance of training surgeons who sub-specialize in cancer surgery lies in evidence, supported by a number of clinical trials, that outcomes in surgical cancer care are positively associated to surgeon volume—i.e., the more cancer cases a surgeon treats, the more proficient he or she becomes, and his or her patients experience improved survival rates as a result. This is another controversial point, but it is generally accepted—even as common sense—that a surgeon who performs a given operation more often, will achieve superior results when compared with a surgeon who rarely performs the same procedure. This is particularly true of complex cancer resections such as pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic cancer, and gastrectomy with extended (D2) lymphadenectomy for gastric cancer.

Cardiothoracic surgery

Most cardiothoracic surgeons in the U.S. (D.O. or M.D.) first complete a general surgery residency (typically 5–7 years), followed by a cardiothoracic surgery fellowship (typically 2–3 years).

Pediatric Surgery

Pediatric surgery is a subspecialty of general surgery pediatric surgeons do surgery on patients age lower than 18. pediatric surgery is 5–7 years of residency and a 2-3 fellowship

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Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Radiation Oncology, Medical Physics

Experts Clearinghouse LLC consistently delivers the most sought after diagnostic and interventional radiologists to law firms, corporations, and governments who need them the most. Our network includes the absolute best credentialed and respected practitioners who testify in the toughest of scenarios, often when other networks have failed.

Call us today for your free initial consultation at 713-501-8526 or e-mail at medexperts@gmail.com.

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Experts Clearinghouse experts in this Specialty have a certificate issued by:  American Board of Radiology

Subspecialties include:  Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Neuroradiology, Nuclear Radiology, Pediatric Radiology, Vascular and Interventional Radiology

Expert Witness Location Difficulty Level:  MEDIUM

States represented by the network:  Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming

Typical minimum fee for Record Review and Report Writing for this Specialty:  $250 per hour

Typical minimum fee for Testimony for this Specialty:  $300 per hour

For a more complete explanation of Fees, click here

Medical Malpractice issues:  Standard of care

Mass Tort involvements:  Radiologists for Prempro related to breast cancer

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Taken from Wikipedia.org:

Radiology is a medical specialty that uses imaging to diagnose and treat diseases seen within the body. Radiologists use a variety of imaging techniques such as X-ray radiography, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), nuclear medicineincluding positron emission tomography (PET), and magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) to diagnose and/or treat diseases. Interventional radiology is the performance of (usually minimally invasive) medical procedures with the guidance of imaging technologies.

The acquisition of medical imaging is usually carried out by the radiographer, often known as a radiologic technologist. Depending on location, the diagnostic radiologist, or reporting radiographer, then interprets or “reads” the images and produces a report of their findings and impression or diagnosis. This report is then transmitted to the physician who ordered the imaging, either routinely or emergently. Imaging exams are stored digitally in the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) where they can be viewed by all members of the healthcare team within the same health system and compared later on with future imaging exams.

Interventional Radiology

Interventional radiology (IR or sometimes VIR for vascular and interventional radiology) is a subspecialty of radiology in which minimally invasive procedures are performed using image guidance. Some of these procedures are done for purely diagnostic purposes (e.g., angiogram), while others are done for treatment purposes (e.g.,angioplasty).

The basic concept behind interventional radiology is to diagnose or treat pathologies, with the most minimally invasive technique possible. Interventional radiologists and interventional radiographers[5] diagnose and treat several disorders, includingperipheral vascular disease, renal artery stenosis, inferior vena cava filter placement,gastrostomy tube placements, biliary stents and hepatic interventions. Images are used for guidance, and the primary instruments used during the procedure are needles andcatheters. The images provide maps that allow the clinician to guide these instruments through the body to the areas containing disease. By minimizing the physical trauma to the patient, peripheral interventions can reduce infection rates and recovery times, as well as hospital stays. To be a trained interventionalist in the United States, an individual completes a five-year residency in radiology and a one- or two-year fellowship in IR.[6]

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Psychiatry, Neurology, Child Neurology

Experts Clearinghouse LLC consistently delivers the most sought after psychiatrists and neurologists to law firms, corporations, and governments who need them the most.  Our network includes the absolute best credentialed and respected practitioners who testify in the toughest of scenarios, often when other networks have failed.

Call us today for your free initial consultation at 713-501-8526 or e-mail at medexperts@gmail.com.

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Experts Clearinghouse experts in this Specialty have a certificate issued by:  American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology

Subspecialties include:  Addiction Psychiatry, Brain Injury Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Clinical Neurophysiology, Epilepsy, Forensic Psychiatry, Geriatric Psychiatry, Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Neurodevelopmental Disabilities, Neuromuscular Medicine, Pain Medicine, Psychosomatic Medicine, Sleep Medicine, Vascular Neurology

Expert Witness Location Difficulty Level:  MEDIUM

States represented by the network:  Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming

Typical minimum fee for Record Review and Report Writing for this Specialty:  $250 per hour

Typical minimum fee for Testimony for this Specialty:  $300 per hour

For a more complete explanation of Fees, click here

Medical Malpractice issues:  Standard of care

Mass Tort involvements:

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Taken from Wikipedia.org:

Psychiatry is the medical specialty devoted to the study, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of mental disorders. These include various affective, behavioural, cognitive and perceptual abnormalities.

Initial psychiatric assessment of a person typically begins with a case history and mental status examination. Psychological tests and physical examinations may be conducted, including on occasion the use of neuroimaging or otherneurophysiological techniques. Mental disorders are often diagnosed in accordance with criteria listed in diagnostic manuals such as the widely used Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), published by the American Psychiatric Association, and the International Classification of Diseases (ICD), edited and used by the World Health Organization. The fifth edition of the DSM (DSM-5) was published in 2013, and its development was expected to be of significant interest to many medical fields.[1]

The combined treatment of psychiatric medication and psychotherapy has become the most common mode of psychiatric treatment in current practice,[2] but current practice also includes widely ranging variety of other modalities. Treatment may be delivered on an inpatient or outpatient basis, depending on the severity of functional impairment or on other aspects of the disorder in question. Research and treatment within psychiatry, as a whole, are conducted on an interdisciplinary basis, sourcing an array of sub-specialties and theoretical approaches.

Neurology (from Greek: ??????, neuron, and the suffix -????? -logia “study of”) is a branch of medicine dealing with disorders of the nervous system. Neurology deals with the diagnosis and treatment of all categories of conditions and disease involving the central and peripheral nervous system(and its subdivisions, the autonomic nervous system and the somatic nervous system); including their coverings, blood vessels, and all effector tissue, such as muscle.[1] Neurological practice relies heavily on the field of neuroscience, which is the scientific study of the nervous system.

A neurologist is a physician specializing in neurology and trained to investigate, or diagnose and treat neurological disorders.[2] Neurologists may also be involved in clinical research, clinical trials, and basic or translational research. While neurology is a non-surgical specialty, its corresponding surgical specialty is neurosurgery.[2]

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Aerospace Medicine, Occupational Medicine, Public Health and General Preventive Medicine

Experts Clearinghouse LLC consistently delivers the most sought after aerospace medicine, cccupational medicine, public health and general preventive medicine physicians to law firms, corporations, and governments who need them the most.  Our network includes the absolute best credentialed and respected practitioners who testify in the toughest of scenarios, often when other networks have failed.

Call us today for your free initial consultation at 713-501-8526 or e-mail at medexperts@gmail.com.

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Experts Clearinghouse experts in this Specialty have a certificate issued by:  American Board of Preventive Medicine

Subspecialties include:  Clinical Informatics, Medical Toxicology, Undersea and Hyperbaric Medicine

Expert Witness Location Difficulty Level:  HIGH

States represented by the network:  Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming

Typical minimum fee for Record Review and Report Writing for this Specialty:  $250 per hour

Typical minimum fee for Testimony for this Specialty:  $300 per hour

For a more complete explanation of Fees, click here

Medical Malpractice issues:  Standard of care

Mass Tort involvements:

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Taken from Wikipedia.org:

Aviation medicine, also called flight medicine or aerospace medicine, is a preventive or occupational medicine in which the patients/subjects are pilots, aircrews, or persons involved in spaceflight.[1] The specialty strives to treat or prevent conditions to which aircrews are particularly susceptible, applies medical knowledge to the human factors in aviation and is thus a critical component of aviation safety.[1] A military practitioner of aviation medicine may be called a flight surgeon and a civilian practitioner is an aviation medical examiner.[1] One of the biggest differences between the military and civilian flight docs is the military flight surgeon’s requirement to log flight hours.[2]

Occupational medicine is the branch of clinical medicine most active in the field of occupational health. OM specialists work to ensure that the highest standards of occupational health and safety can be achieved and maintained. While it may involve a wide number of disciplines, it centers on the preventive medicine and management of illness, injury or disability that is related to the workplace.[1] Occupational physicians must have a wide knowledge of clinical medicine and be competent in a number of important areas. They often advise international bodies, governmental and state agencies, organizations and trade unions. There are contextual links to insurance medicine.

Preventive healthcare (alternately preventive medicine or prophylaxis) consists of measures taken for disease prevention, as opposed to disease treatment.[1][2] Just as health encompasses a variety of physical and mental states, so do disease and disability, which are affected by environmental factors, genetic predisposition, disease agents, and lifestyle choices. Health, disease, and disability are dynamic processes which begin before individuals realize they are affected. Disease prevention relies on anticipatory actions that can be categorized as primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention.[2]

Each year, millions of people die preventable deaths. A 2004 study showed that about half of all deaths in the United States in 2000 were due to preventable behaviors and exposures.[3] Leading causes included cardiovascular disease, chronicrespiratory disease, unintentional injuries, diabetes, and certain infectious diseases.[3] This same study estimates that 400,000 people die each year in the United States due to poor diet and a sedentary lifestyle.[3] According to estimates made by the World Health Organization (WHO), about 55 million people died worldwide in 2011, two thirds of this group from non-communicable diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and chronic cardiovascular and lung diseases.[4] This is an increase from the year 2000, during which 60% of deaths were attributed to these diseases.[4] Preventive healthcare is especially important given the worldwide rise in prevalence of chronic diseases and deaths from these diseases.

There are many methods for prevention of disease. It is recommended that adults and children aim to visit their doctor for regular check-ups, even if they feel healthy, to perform disease screening, identify risk factors for disease, discuss tips for a healthy and balanced lifestyle, stay up to date with immunizations and boosters, and maintain a good relationship with a healthcare provider.[5] Some common disease screenings include checking for hypertension (high blood pressure),hyperglycemia (high blood sugar, a risk factor for diabetes mellitus), hypercholesterolemia (high blood cholesterol), screening for colon cancer, depression, HIV and other common types of sexually transmitted disease such as chlamydia,syphilis, and gonorrhea, mammography (to screen for breast cancer), colorectal cancer screening, a pap test (to check forcervical cancer), and screening for osteoporosis. Genetic testing can also be performed to screen for mutations that causegenetic disorders or predisposition to certain diseases such as breast or ovarian cancer.[5] However, these measures are not affordable for every individual and the cost effectiveness of preventive healthcare is still a topic of debate.[6][7]

Public health refers to “the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting health through organized efforts and informed choices of society, organizations, public and private, communities and individuals.”[1] It is concerned with threats to health based on population health analysis. The population in question can be as small as a handful of people, or as large as all the inhabitants of several continents (for instance, in the case of a pandemic). The dimensions of health can encompass “a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity”, as defined by the United Nations’ World Health Organization.[2] Public health incorporates the interdisciplinaryapproaches of epidemiology, biostatistics and health services. Environmental health, community health, behavioral health, health economics, public policy,insurance medicine and occupational safety and health are other important subfields.

The focus of public health intervention is to improve health and quality of life through prevention and treatment of disease and other physical and mental health conditions. This is done through surveillance of cases and health indicators, and through promotion of healthy behaviors. Examples of common public health measures include promotion of hand washing, breastfeeding, delivery of vaccinations, and distribution of condoms to control the spread of sexually transmitted diseases.

Modern public health practice requires multidisciplinary teams of public health workers and professionals includingphysicians specializing in public health/community medicine/infectious disease, psychologists, epidemiologists,biostatisticians, medical assistants or Assistant Medical Officers, public health nurses, midwives, medical microbiologists,environmental health officers / public health inspectors, pharmacists, dental hygienists, dietitians and nutritionists,veterinarians, public health engineers, public health lawyers, sociologists, community development workers, communications experts, bioethicists, and others.[3]

There is a great disparity in access to health care and public health initiatives between developed nations and developing nations. In the developing world, public health infrastructures are still forming.

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Plastic Surgery

Experts Clearinghouse LLC consistently delivers the most sought after plastic surgeons to law firms, corporations, and governments who need them the most. Our network includes the absolute best credentialed and respected practitioners who testify in the toughest of scenarios, often when other networks have failed.

Call us today for your free initial consultation at 713-501-8526 or e-mail at medexperts@gmail.com.

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Experts Clearinghouse experts in this Specialty have a certificate issued by:  American Board of Plastic Surgery

Subspecialties include:  Plastic Surgery Within the Head and Neck, Surgery of the Hand

Expert Witness Location Difficulty Level:  MEDIUM

States represented by the network:  Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming

Typical minimum fee for Record Review and Report Writing for this Specialty:  $250 per hour

Typical minimum fee for Testimony for this Specialty:  $300 per hour

For a more complete explanation of Fees, click here

Medical Malpractice issues:  Standard of care

Mass Tort involvements:

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Taken from Wikipedia.org:

Plastic surgery is a medical procedure with the purpose of alteration or restoring the form of the body. Though cosmetic or aesthetic surgery is the most well known kind of plastic surgery, plastic surgery itself is not necessarily considered cosmetic;[2] and includes many types of reconstructive surgery,craniofacial surgery, hand surgery, microsurgery, and the treatment of burns.

In the term plastic surgery, the adjective plastic implies sculpting or reshaping, which is derived from the Greek ???????? (?????), plastik? (tekhn?), “the art of modelling” of malleable flesh.[3] This meaning in English is attested as early as 1598.[4]The surgical definition of “plastic” first appeared in 1839, preceding the modern “engineering material made from petroleum” sense of plastic (coined by Leo Baekeland in 1909) by seventy years.[5]

Reconstructive plastic surgery is performed to correct functional impairments caused by burns; traumatic injuries, such as facial bone fractures and breaks; congenital abnormalities, such as cleft palates or cleft lips; developmental abnormalities; infection and disease; and cancer or tumors. Reconstructive plastic surgery is usually performed to improve function, but it may be done to approximate a normal appearance.

The most common reconstructive procedures are tumor removal, laceration repair, scar repair, hand surgery, and breast reduction plasty. According to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, the number of reconstructive breast reductions for women increased in 2007 by 2 percent from the year before. Breast reduction in men also increased in 2007 by 7 percent. In 2012, there were 68,416 performed.

Some other common reconstructive surgical procedures include breast reconstruction after a mastectomy for the treatment of cancer, cleft lip and palate surgery, contracture surgery for burn survivors, and creating a new outer ear when one is congenitally absent.

Plastic surgeons use microsurgery to transfer tissue for coverage of a defect when no local tissue is available. Free flaps of skin, muscle, bone, fat, or a combination may be removed from the body, moved to another site on the body, and reconnected to a blood supply by suturing arteries and veins as small as 1 to 2 millimeters in diameter.

Cosmetic surgery

Cosmetic surgery is an optional procedure that is performed on normal parts of the body with the only purpose of improving a person’s appearance and/or removing signs of aging. In 2014, nearly 16 million cosmetic procedures were performed in the United States alone.[19] The number of cosmetic procedures performed in the United States has almost doubled since the start of the century. 92% of cosmetic procedures were performed on women in 2014 up from 88% in 2001.[20] Nearly 12 million cosmetic procedures were performed in 2007, with the five most common surgeries being breast augmentation, liposuction, nasal surgery, eyelid surgery and abdominoplasty. The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery looks at the statistics for thirty-four different cosmetic procedures. Nineteen of the procedures are surgical, such as rhinoplasty or facelift. The nonsurgical procedures include Botox and laser hair removal. In 2010, their survey revealed that there were 9,336,814 total procedures in the United States. Of those, 1,622,290 procedures were surgical (p. 5). They also found that a large majority, 81%, of the procedures were done on Caucasian people (p. 12).[21] The increased use of cosmetic procedures crosses racial and ethnic lines in the U.S., with increases seen among African-Americans, Asian Americans and Hispanic Americans as well as Caucasian Americans. In Europe, the second largest market for cosmetic procedures, cosmetic surgery is a $2.2 billion business.[22] In Asia, cosmetic surgery has become more popular, and countries such as China and India have become Asia’s biggest cosmetic surgery markets.[23]

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Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Experts Clearinghouse LLC consistently delivers the most sought after physical medicine and rehabilitation physicians to law firms, corporations, and governments who need them the most.  Our network includes the absolute best credentialed and respected practitioners who testify in the toughest of scenarios, often when other networks have failed.

Call us today for your free initial consultation at 713-501-8526 or e-mail at medexperts@gmail.com.

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Experts Clearinghouse experts in this Specialty have a certificate issued by:  American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Subspecialties include:  Brain Injury Medicine, Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Neuromuscular Medicine, Pain Medicine, Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine, Spinal Cord Injury Medicine, Sports Medicine

Expert Witness Location Difficulty Level:  MEDIUM

States represented by the network:  Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming

Typical minimum fee for Record Review and Report Writing for this Specialty:  $250 per hour

Typical minimum fee for Testimony for this Specialty:  $300 per hour

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Medical Malpractice issues:  Standard of care

Mass Tort involvements:

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Taken from Wikipedia.org:

Physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R), also known as physiatry/f??za?.?tri/ or rehabilitation medicine, is a branch of medicine that aims to enhance and restore functional ability and quality of life to those with physical impairments or disabilities. A physician having completed training in this field is referred to as a physiatrist. Physiatrists specialize in restoring optimal function to people with injuries to the muscles, bones, and nervous system.[1]

Scope of the field

Common conditions that are treated by rehabilitation therapists include

Cardiopulmonary rehabilitation involves optimizing function in those afflicted with heart or lung disease. Chronic painmanagement is achieved through a multidisciplinary approach involving

Stroke, in addition to the previous methodology, is often treated with the help of a speech therapist and recreational therapist when possible.[2] Physical medicine and rehabilitation physicians utilized electrodiagnostic medicine studies to help diagnose patients with symptoms of numbness, cramps or tingling.

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Pediatrics

Experts Clearinghouse LLC consistently delivers the most sought after pediatricians to law firms, corporations, and governments who need them the most.  Our network includes the absolute best credentialed and respected practitioners who testify in the toughest of scenarios, often when other networks have failed.

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Experts Clearinghouse experts in this Specialty have a certificate issued by:  American Board of Pediatrics

Subspecialties include:  Adolescent Medicine, Child Abuse Pediatrics, Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics, Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Medical Toxicology, Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Neurodevelopmental Disabilities, Pediatric Cardiology, Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Pediatric Endocrinology, Pediatric Gastroenterology, Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Pediatric Nephrology, Pediatric Pulmonology, Pediatric Rheumatology, Pediatric Transplant Hepatology, Sleep Medicine, Sports Medicine

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States represented by the network:  Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming

Typical minimum fee for Record Review and Report Writing for this Specialty:  $250 per hour

Typical minimum fee for Testimony for this Specialty:  $300 per hour

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Medical Malpractice issues:  Standard of care

Mass Tort involvements:

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Taken from Wikipedia.org:

Pediatrics (also spelled paediatrics or pædiatrics) is the branch of medicinethat deals with the medical care of infants, children, and adolescents, and the age limit usually ranges from birth up to 18 years of age (in some places until completion of secondary education, and until age 21 in the United States).[citation needed] A medical practitioner who specializes in this area is known as a pediatrician, or paediatrician. The word paediatrics and itscognates mean “healer of children”; they derive from two Greek words: ????(pais “child”) and ?????? (iatros “doctor, healer”). Pediatricians work both inhospitals, particularly those working in its specialized subfields such asneonatology, and as primary care physicians who specialize in children.

Subspecialties of pediatrics include:

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