Colon and Rectal Surgery

Experts Clearinghouse LLC consistently delivers the most sought after colon and rectal surgeons to law firms, corporations, and governments who need them the most.  Our network includes the absolute best credentialed and respected practitioners who testify in the toughest of scenarios, often when other networks have failed.

Call us today for your free initial consultation at 713-501-8526 or e-mail at

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Experts Clearinghouse experts in this Specialty have a certificate issued by:  American Board of Colon and Rectal Surgery

Subspecialties include:  None

States represented by the network:  Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming

Expert Witness Location Difficulty Level:  HIGH

Typical minimum fee for Record Review and Report Writing for this Specialty:  $250 per hour

Typical minimum fee for Testimony for this Specialty:  $300 per hour

For a more complete explanation of Fees, click here

Medical Malpractice issues:  Standard of care

Mass Tort involvements:

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Taken from

Colorectal surgery is a field in medicine, dealing with disorders of the rectum,anus, and colon. The field is also known as proctology, but the latter term is now used infrequently within medicine, and is most often employed to identify practices relating to the anus and rectum in particular. The word proctology is derived from the Greek words ??????? proktos, meaning “anus” or “hindparts”, and -????? -logia, meaning “science” or “study”.

Physicians specializing in this field of medicine are called colorectal surgeons or proctologists. In the United States, to become colorectal surgeons, these surgical doctors have to complete a general surgery residency, as well as a colorectal surgery fellowship, upon which they are eligible to be certified in their field of expertise by the American Board of Colon and Rectal Surgery or the American Osteopathic Board of Proctology. In other countries, certification to practice proctology is given to surgeons at the end of a 2-3 year subspecialty residency by the country’s board of surgery.

Scope of the specialty

Colorectal surgical disorders include:

Surgical treatment and diagnostic procedures

Surgical forms of treatment for these conditions include: colectomy, ileo/colostomy, polypectomy, strictureplasty, hemorrhoidectomy (in severe cases of hemorrhoids), anoplasty, and more depending on the condition the patient suffers from. Diagnostic procedures, such as a colonoscopy, are very important in colorectal surgery, as they can tell the physician what type of diagnosis should be given and what procedure should be done to correct the condition. Other diagnostic procedures used by colorectal surgeons include: proctoscopy, defecating proctography, sigmoidoscopy. In recent times, thelaparoscopic method of surgery has seen a surge of popularity, due to its lower risks, decreased recovery time, and smaller, more precise incisions achieved by using laparoscopic instruments.

Another new, revolutionary method of surgery, the CARP method (Compression Anastomotic Ring-locking Procedure) is underway in Europe.[citation needed] This new method is fast becoming the preferred choice due to exceptional benefits to patients in regards to faster healing process, reliability, and quick leak-detection potential.[citation needed] The reduced need for a protective stoma is another appealing attribute.[citation needed]

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